Friday, October 31, 2014

OJ HØJTRYK A/S - IAF1404


OJ HØJTRYK A/S endeavours to be a powerful, vigorous and energetic company. With our customers needs and the immediate environment as our point of departure, we want to be a trendsetter in our core area of business - Mechanical Engineering - Re-working of Dies and Rollers for the manufacture of Feedstuffs and Biopellets, as well as the sale and delivery of wearing parts in connection with Roller Re-working - as well as to remain open to new initiatives and business opportunities.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

31/10/2014: Six Mile Water fish kill: Almost 1000 fish confirmed dead in pollution incident

Almost 1000 fish have been confirmed dead in a water pollution incident in County Antrim and investigators have declared it as a "major fish kill." reports the BBC in Ireland.
 


The incident in the Six Mile Water, near Ballyclare, was discovered on Wednesday, when anglers found dozens of dead fish in the water.

Fisheries staff have confirmed the number of dead fish now stands at 964.

The Department of Environment said "this water pollution incident is now classified as being of high severity".

A spokesperson for the department added: "Investigations are ongoing in an effort to determine the cause."

The fish kill was reported to the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) on Wednesday morning. The information came to the agency via its water pollution hotline.

A NIEA water quality inspector was immediately sent to the scene to investigate and assess the environmental impact.


Staff from the Department for Culture Arts and Leisure (DCAL)'s Inland Fisheries Group were also called to the site to assess the number of fish affected.

In a statement on Thursday, Environment Minister Mark H Durkan said: "I am concerned about this.

"I will be monitoring developments here closely along with my NIEA officials."


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

31/10/2014: Ross salmon farm hit by 'challenging' sea lice problem

A salmon farming company has pledged to take further action over "challenging" levels of sea lice at one of its Ross-shire locations, reports the Ross-Shire Journal.
 


Norwegian-owned Marine Harvest said it was "extremely disappointed" with the problem it faces at Loch Duich.


Managing director Alan Sutherland said: “We have been extremely disappointed with the sea lice situation at Loch Duich.

"We have worked very hard in challenging circumstances to reduce the sea lice numbers which, at their peak, were averaging 41.7 lice per fish in this particular loch."

Sea lice are a concern in salmon aquaculture where the health and quality of the fish can be affected. Concerns have also been voiced about the possible impact on wild salmon stocks.

The company has outlined plans to introduce a sea lice predator fish across its farms and pledged to keep local communities aware of what its doing.

"We have been using a number of different treatments, but in the end we decided the best course of action was to harvest all the fish with the farm being empty by the end of September.

“We take our responsibilities to the environment very seriously.

"This is below the standards we aim to achieve as a company and we are taking action to ensure it doesn’t happen again in the future.

"All the farms in the loch system – not simply Loch Duich – have been left fallow for a considerable period.

“For the next farming cycle beginning in early 2015 we plan to introduce wrasse which have been successful in tackling sea lice in other areas.

"Wrasse, otherwise known as cleaner fish, are a sea lice predator and are being introduced across Marine Harvest farms following successful trials in Scotland in recent years.
“By having wrasse alongside salmon in our pens we have reduced the need for medicine use.

"We are still learning about working with wrasse and their welfare requirements in particular but we have been greatly encouraged by the results on other farms.
"We did try using wrasse later on in the farming cycle in Loch Duich but we realise now this was probably too late so next time they will be introduced earlier in the cycle.

“We are striving to achieve Aquaculture Stewardship Council standards on our farms and part of that process is a commitment to being open and transparent.

"We will ensure local communities are kept informed where there are any significant issues, such as this, in relation to our salmon farming operations.”


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

31/10/2014: New protein ingredient save farmers millions in feed costs

A new high protein feed could save Australian abalone farmers up to Aus$2.5 million a year and local growers are following the product with interest, reports the West Coast Sentinel.

The feed, which was developed by South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI) scientists, was made to meet nutritional needs of farmed abalone.
 


The breakthrough will help to lift productivity and will allow producers to meet rising demand for the premium seafood in high-value markets such as China, South East Asia and the United States.

SARDI scientist Dr David Stone said the project began last year and trialed the nutritional needs of abalone during their 30 month production cycle.

"The laboratory based trials confirmed that the protein requirements for abalone varied with both age and seasonal changes in water temperature," he said.

"The results so far are right on target of achieving a 10 percent improvement in abalone growth rates, which eliminates about three months from the usual production cycle."

Local farm SAM Abalone produces about 150 tonnes of greenlip abalone from two farms at Boston Point.
Farm manager Tom Hyde said he had been following the SARDI trials with interest.

"The performance of the high protein diet on our Kangaroo Island and Portland sites show there is real potential for improved growth and productivity," he said.
"We are planning to trial it commercially on our Lincoln sites this summer."

Fisheries Minister Gail Gago said the feed would help producers in the market and encourage others to become part of abalone growth.

"Australia's abalone exports currently weigh in at about 700 tonnes a year, with a farmgate value of $24.5 million," she said.

"The latest on-farm results for the SARDI high protein feeding system confirm expectations of productivity increases, which is an exciting prospect for a niche industry that is aiming to meet the growing demand in valuable export markets."

http://www.westcoastsentinel.com.au/story/1674891/abalone-feed-to-save-millions/?cs=4188


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Thursday, October 30, 2014

LIPTOSA - IAF1404

Lípidos Toledo S.A. began in 1996 as a family business and under the guidance of a group of professionals with extensive experience in the Animal Nutrition field. From the outset, the company's mission has been to provide its clients with personalised service and efficient, natural products that are able to meet the demands of the sector.

Facilities

In 2000 Lípidos Toledo S.A. moved its facilities, building a modern manufacturing plant in Talavera de la Reina (Toledo). In 2012 it acquired a new industrial warehouse in the vicinity of the main facilities where the manufacturing of the powder additives takes place and a third storage warehouse.

With these new facilities Lípidos Toledo S.A. is able to have separate manufacturing lines for the different products they manufacture avoiding the risk of cross contamination.


Furthermore, the new facilities enable to company to manufacture products with fishmeal derivatives, allowing the company to further expansion, mainly in the aquaculture range.

The facilities allow the manufacture of nutritional products, liquid and powder based phytobiotic additives,nutraceutical products and nutritional and specialty products without any risk of the products becoming cross contaminated.

In 2010, Lípidos Toledo S.A. acquired a large office space at C/ San Romualdo 12-14 in Madrid where all logistics work is carried out.


This enables Lípidos Toledo S.A. to fulfil its objective of manufacturing products of the highest quality and providing its clients the best service.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

30/10/2014: Trends in global compound production


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

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30/10/2014: Oldendorff becomes a member of the World Ocean Council

Oldendorff Carriers, headquartered in Lübeck, Germany, has become a member of the World Ocean Council (WOC), expanding the geographic scope and diversity of this unprecedented global ocean industry alliance.



With more than 40 new vessels expected in the next 2-3 years, Oldendorff’s Green Ships Program clearly demonstrates company leadership in tackling environmental issues and overall fleet performance.

Oldendorff’s Managing Director, Thomas Weber, stated, “Oldendorff is pleased to become a member of the World Ocean Council. The WOC has created an international cross-sectoral forum for ocean industry collaboration on sustainability that doesn’t exist elsewhere.”

Oldendorff has already participated actively in WOC events, such as the recent WOC Business Forum on Ocean Policy and Planning (New York City, 28-30 September, 2014).

Capt Paul Jeffrey, Senior Port Projects Manager for Oldendorff, participated in the event and noted, “The WOC role on ocean policy is crucial to not only to the shipping sector, but to all ocean industries. The WOC is usually the only ocean industry presence at the UN and other international meetings on cross-cutting ocean policy, such as the current Law of the Sea negotiations.

The WOC Business Forum last month exemplifies WOC’s unique and vital role in bringing together the diverse ocean business community.”


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

30/10/2014: Woolworths commits to sourcing ASC certified seafood

Leading South African retailer, Woolworths, has pledged to source their farmed seafood from sustainable and responsible operations by 2020.

Woolworths has joined a growing number of businesses making formal commitments to support responsible aquaculture practices. The premium food and clothing retailer introduced its sustainable seafood policy in 2008 and was the first retailer to sign the WWF-SASSI Retail Charter*, it then went on to introduce its Fishing for the Future programme.

By the end of 2015, all of Woolworths’ farmed products will be sourced from aquaculture operations that are:

  • Engaged in a credible, time-bound improvement project* or, where applicable
  • WWF-SASSI green-listed, or
  • Formally committed to achieving the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) certification or have other credible standards in place
And by the end of 2020, all aquaculture species sold will be:
  • From aquaculture operations that are engaged in a credible, time-bound Improvement Project*, or
  • WWF-SASSI green-listed, or
  • Where applicable, ASC (or equivalent) certified
Committing to a responsible future
Woolworths prides itself on providing its customers with a wide range of seafood from responsible, well-managed sources. To achieve this they worked for many years with organisations such as WWF to help them meet their goals.

Hezron Joseph, Woolworths Seafood Technologist, said: “Woolworths is dedicated to seafood sustainability and providing the best for our customers. Through our Fishing for the Future programme we are helping aquaculture become a more environmentally and socially responsible choice for our customers. Our commitments, which include the ASC, help us achieve this by ensuring that our seafood is responsibly sourced and traceable back to the farm that raised it.”

Esther Luiten, ASC’s Commercial Marketing Manager, said: “I applaud Woolworths for its commitment to responsible aquaculture and recognising the importance of moving global production to a more sustainable basis. It is great that Woolworths is offering a responsible choice for consumers in South Africa. I look forward to working with them as they strive to meet their sustainability goals.”

More information around their public commitments and other milestones can be found on their website at

Helping consumers make positive choices
To meet their commitment, Woolworths hopes to offer consumers ASC certified trout, salmon and shrimp in the near future.

The ASC on-product logo makes it easier for consumers to get involved and make positive environmental and socially responsible choices. The commitment by Woolworths means consumers will find it easier to choose certified responsible seafood.

ASC certified seafood, bearing the consumer label, is a credible responsible product that helps retailers address the growing demand for responsibly produced seafood.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

LEIBER - IAF1404


Leiber has more than 140 employees. Each is a specialist in his or her domain. A well-proven team in a company following a clear strategy for more than 50 years: Working with values.

What makes us unique? We focus on what we know best. Yeast. Production on the highest level of quality. Latest technology. New findings from science and research. The performance of a team of specialists. This is what defines Leiber´s strategic orientation. This is what makes us truly entrepreneurial.

The markets´ requirements are changing - we are able to follow. This is how we became one of the leading manufacturers of specialised yeast products.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

29/10/2014: Algae found in human DNA

Researchers, whose paper appeared in 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Science', have found DNA resembling that of an algae-native chlorovirus while taking throat swabs from healthy human subjects during a study on cognitive functioning, reports Phys Org.
 


The discovery represents the first documented case of chlorovirus gene sequences in the human throat cavity, the researchers reported.

"Chloroviruses are worldwide," said senior author James Van Etten, William Allington Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology and a co-director of the Nebraska Center for Virology, who helped discover their existence in green algae more than 30 years ago. "They're very common among inland bodies of fresh water such as lakes and ponds.

"But I don't know of many examples of viruses jumping from one kingdom to another. If this turns out to be true, this is quite rare and a total surprise."


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

29/10/2014: The live feed revolution



Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

29/10/2014: BOFFF fish are the ones not to catch

A growing collection of research shows that big, old, fat, fertile female fish -- what scientists call BOFFFFs -- are critically important to ocean fisheries because they’re basically rockstars of reproduction, reports The Huffington Post.
 


Conventional wisdom has held that, in order to protect ocean stocks and maintain strong populations, fishermen should catch big fish but release smaller ones so that they can grow, produce eggs and continue the circle of life.

But in the October 2014 issue of the “ICES Journal of Marine Science”, three experts argue that fishing efforts should focus on medium sized fish, rather than snatching out and bragging about the huge ones.

“The loss of big fish [often] decreases the productivity and stability of fishery stocks,” explained Mark Hixon, a marine biologist at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, who published the paper with California State University marine biologist Darren Johnson and NOAA Fisheries ecologist Susan Sogard. Such loss, the trio wrote, can lead to a fish population’s collapse.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/23/boffffs-big-fat-fish-research_n_6039252.html


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

29/10/2014: FDA report discount claims of rampant seafood mislabeling

A new report from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) counters the claims of rampant seafood mislabeling made by Oceana and multiple media organizations, reports Seafood Source.

The results of the FDA’s extensive, two-year seafood labeling investigation found that 85 percent of the seafood it tested was properly labeled.

In fiscal year 2012 and 2013, the agency conducted nearly 700 DNA tests on cod, haddock, catfish, snapper, grouper and pangasius samples. At FDA investigators’ discretion, additional sampling was taken from other species, including mahimahi, orange roughy, monkfish and swordfish.

The samples of fillets, whole fish and packaged fish were collected from wholesalers in 14 states, prior to being sold in restaurants or at retail stores. The FDA found that none of the catfish, cod, haddock, swai, mahimahi, orange roughy, monkfish and swordfish were mislabeled. However, 37 percent of the snapper samples were mislabeled, as were 11 percent of grouper samples.

“This extensive federal analysis brings the challenge of mislabeling into a much clearer focus,” said John Connelly, president of the National Fisheries Institute (NFI), in a statement. 


“While at the same time calling into question other mislabeling ‘studies’ that suggest the issue is widespread and in need of a legislative fix.”

NFI officials said the study results confirm what the organization has been pushing for: enforcement of federal and state anti-fraud labeling laws, rather than new legislation.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

29/10/2014: Lake Victoria's cage fish farming a potential 'gold mine'

a report by ISAIAH GWENGI on Standard Digital
When Prof Stephen Agong’ floated the idea of converting Lake Victoria into a fish cage, many thought he was out of his mind.

Those initial attempts by the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology (Jooust) Vice Chancellor to sell the idea to Miyandhe community, which is predominantly dependent on fishing as their source of income, did not yield results.
 


The fishermen even refused to go to the lake and have a first-hand look at what was being talked about. But a few months later, it turns out that what Miyandhe people thought was fantasy is now a glaring reality.

A visit by The Standard to the area where cage fish farming is being practiced revealed that this enterprise may very well be the next wave of hope for the county’s lakeside community.
 

According to Prof Agong’, cage fish farming involves putting fingerlings into a cage, to protect them from predators, providing them with a controlled diet then monitoring and harvesting the stock once it is ready for consumption.

It is a simple and highly productive fish farming technique that many locals have not considered. But for a valid reason.


Though the enterprise is promising and returns can be rewarding, setting up a single fish cage is quite costly for the common fisherman.

“A cage measuring around 2x4 metres can cost at least Sh80,000 (US$900). That would be more than the annual returns of most fishermen. The good news is that you can get your money back in less than a year,” explained Agong’.

According to the Professor, if you invest the said Sh80,000 to set up a fish cage and start your farm with about 2000 fingerlings, you will harvest about 90 percent of the total number of fingerlings you started with.

“This translates to 1800 fish. A fully grown Tilapia or Nile perch is sold at around Sh150 (US$1.70) in the local market. Therefore, with a harvest of 1800 fish, you are talking about a whooping Sh270,000 (US$770) in six months,” he said.

Jooust is currently in the process of installing the fish cages at its pilot project site in Miyandhe, Bondo sub-county where the plan is to build seven fish cages in phase one.

“So far we have invested close to Sh1 million, although the whole project is estimated at over Sh5 million (US$56,000),” the vice chancellor said.

If things go as planned, the multimillion shilling enterprise will give birth to a reliable source of income for the university and the community will reap unimaginable benefits.

Prof Agong’ said the university projects being able to recoup its original capital investment, possibly after the first harvest, and then reinvest the revenue to upscale the project.


“Miyandhe residents will be given a chance to each own a Sh80,000 (US$900) cage on credit, which they will be required to repay within six months,” he said.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

GEPRO - IAF1404

GePro Gefluegel-Protein Vertriebs- gesellschaft mbH & Co. KG is a group company of PHW, one of the largest producers of poultry products in Europe. As a member of PHW, GePro is part of a completely integrated poultry production.

GePro headquarter is in Diepholz (Germany) with global sales offices located in Bangkok (Kingdom of Thailand) and Moscow (Russian Federation).

GePro transforms poultry by-products from the slaughterhouse into valuable ingredients for animal nutrition and biofuel (SP-Power).

With the state of the art production systems, our products are of extremely high quality and are regarded as benchmarks in the industry. The entire process is under strict veterinarian control leading to consistent flawless quality and great value proposition for our customers.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

28/10/2014: Fostering transatlantic research – for both fisheries and aquaculture

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) used its recent council meeting to emphasise its key role in fostering transatlantic research – for both fisheries and aquaculture, reports fishnewseu.com.

"For more than 100 years, ICES has been the established organization for transatlantic cooperation on marine science issues. We have 4000 scientists, on both sides of the Atlantic, working together to provide the best available science for decision-makers to make informed choices on the sustainable use of the marine environment and ecosystems," explained ICES First Vice-President Cornelius Hammer, who leads ICES work on maritime transatlantic cooperation.

"ICES offers its network, working groups, and infrastructure as a platform to the Transatlantic Ocean Research Alliance to further cooperation and meet the political initiatives recently declared in the Galway Statement," Hammer told the annual ICES Council meeting, which was held on 22–23 October in Copenhagen. The Council, ICES principal decision and policy-making body, consists of two delegates from each of the 20 member countries and is led by the President, Dr Paul Connolly.

"This annual meeting gives ICES member countries the opportunity to measure progress in advancing the provision of the scientific knowledge for the sustainable use of the seas, and to assess the implementation of the ICES Strategic Plan," said Connolly.

Arctic and aquaculture in focus
The Council decided to further strengthen the organization's role in Arctic and aquaculture activities. ICES will organize a dialogue meeting in 2015 with stakeholders to discuss how it can provide the scientific advice needed to support sustainability in the growing aquaculture industry.

Deputy Executive Secretary Jan René Larsen from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) - one of six working groups under the Arctic Council - gave feedback to the Delegates' meeting on how ICES can further contribute to Arctic Council's scientific work. Since its inception in 1991, AMAP has used ICES monitoring guidelines, data management, and assessment frameworks. In the future, both ICES and AMAP plan to establish further joint initiatives to assess changes in the Arctic marine environment, and collaborate on the development of Arctic integrated ecosystem assessments.

New Vice-Presidents
Four new Vice-Presidents were elected to ICES Bureau, the executive body of the Council: Kai Myrberg (Finland), Pierre Petitgas (France), Jóhann Sigurjónsson (Iceland), and Tammo Bult (the Netherlands) will start their 3-year term on 1 November.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

28/10/2014: Microbes could be used to detox marine pollutants

A new study has shown how special cellular chemistry allows microbes to strip pollutants of halogen atoms. The finding could be useful for tackling marine toxins, reports the Digital Journal.

Several types of bacteria found free-living in deep-sea sediments can produce enzymes that can dehalogenate long-lived environmental toxins such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins.
 
A view of the active site of a reductive dehalogenase from N. pacificus, shown docked with a 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoic acid substrate.
Credit: Nature

This way to detoxify pollutants is often useful, and it could potentially be made useful if scientists can harness this microbe-power. The first step is to understand exactly how some types of bacteria can reduce the harmfulness of certain pollutants.


The work is important because dioxins are dangerous industrial byproducts. They were once used as coolants in the manufacture of electrical equipment. Although the production of such chemicals was banned globally in 2001, they can remain in the environment, particularly in water.


An advancement has been made this month. Scientists, from the University of Manchester in the UK, have succeeded in purifying an enzyme in a strain of bacteria, called a dehalogenase, and have examined the enzyme's structure and activity. The bacterium studied was Nitratireductor pacificus.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

28/10/2014: A special video following a special event




Memories are made of this.

What this World Nutrition Forum 2014 video doesn't say but firmly conveys is the seriousness of the topics focused upon and the range of outcomes that 800-plus fortunate delegates gained and took with them when this special three-day forum came to an end in Munich, Germany in mid-October.

The Aquaculturists and International Aquafeed will be reporting on the Forum's outcomes over the next weeks and months. Stay tuned!

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Thursday, October 23, 2014

23/10/2014: Lobster caught twice

Scott Hoyt couldn't believe what was in one of his lobster traps. "Wow, I've never seen anything like this," he said as called his wife Charlene to tell her about the yellow lobster.
 
http://www.wcsh6.com/story/entertainment/television/bill-greens-maine/2014/10/20/a-strange-lobster-tale/17625145/
Scott Hoyt couldn't believe what was in one of his lobster traps

Charlene Hoyt is a math teacher at nearby Berwick Academy. The lobster was named "Cal" because someone thought he looked like a calico cat. He was placed in the grammar school touch tank and the kids just loved him.

Charlene started feeling sad for Cal. He spent the entire month of September in the tank with his claws banded.

On the first of October, she did a daring thing. Without telling her husband, she took Cal from the tank and let him go down in Pepperell Cove.

Three days later and Cal was back;right in Scott's lobster trap.

Charlene was shopping when she got the call. "Where's Cal?" asked her husband.

"I knew right away I was busted," laughed Charlene.
Charlene took a stab at computing the odds of a yellow lobster being caught twice by the same fisherman and came up with the number 900 hundred-million to one.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

23/10/14: Investments in innovation and Biorigin customers’ satisfaction are highlighted in the sustainability report

The most recent Sustainability Report of Biorigin, specialized in the development and production of natural ingredients for foods and animal nutrition, brings impressive numbers. The announcement of an investment of US$ 120 million in its plan to expand production, which should increase its net income and cash generation until 2017, is one of them.
 

Another highlight was the result of the satisfaction survey. The general index of customers’ satisfaction was 75.9%, whereas product quality obtained 91.3% approval, both at 95% confidence level.

Brazilian and foreign customers of the Food and Animal Nutrition sectors were interviewed. The survey results generated and action and improvement plan that has already started to be implemented.


The report, available at Biorigin’s website (www.biorigin.net), was produced according to the guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), version G4, launched in 2013.
 

Antonio José Zillo, Director-President, says the focus of the company is sustainable economic growth and generation of value for the shareholders. “We were able to identify opportunities and to find solutions for the challenges, maintaining the competitive level of the company and always aiming at increasing productivity and efficiency in cost management and operations. This is our strength: To make business grow, while respecting people and preserving the environment,” explains Antonio José.

Our distinctive characteristic: traceability

One of the company’ commitment with quality is to constantly monitor hazards in its production chain, implementing specific control measures to prevent any risks for the consumers. This ensures that our final products, such as the ingredients for flavor enhancement, sodium reduction, extension of shelf life of food products, feed nutritional enrichment, and antibiotic replacement for animals that are produced by biotechnological processes, supply the needs of our customers.


Clean electric energy
Biorigin is a business unit of Zilor, a traditional producer of sugar, ethanol, and electric energy from biomass (sugarcane straw and bagasse). The company thereby makes the Brazilian energy matrix cleaner, using a renewable sources, and contributes for the diversification of the company’s portfolio, strengthening its sustainable position. The energy currently exported by Zilor may supply a city with more than 500,000 inhabitants.
 

Certifications and Environmental Agreements
Zilor is one of the first companies of the sugarcane energy sector to receive the sustainability certification Bonsucro, which certifies that the company is audited and complies with the legislation relative to labor requirements, process efficiency management, biodiversity, and continuous improvement.


It participated in the program Água Brasil (water), conceived by Banco do Brasil and developed by the environmental NGO WWF-Brasil. This program aims at stimulating and recommending the application of practices that reduce the environmental impacts of the sugarcane chain in Brazil through studies on afforestation and on the adoption of good agricultural practices.
 

Highlight in figures: 
  • 91.3% Biorigin customers’ satisfaction (relative to product quality 2013/2014) 
  • US$ 120 million invested to increase the production of Biorigin, an strategic action to diversify its portfolio 
  • 100% of sugarcane harvest is now automated 
  • 100% of Zilor’s byproducts are reutilized. 
  • Sugarcane bagasse and straw are used to produce clean electric energy.R$ 6.1 million invested in community projects where Zilor’s units are located (2012/2013 and 2013/2014).
Biorigin
Established in 2003, the company mobilizes knowledge and technology based on biotechnological processes to develop innovative solutions in 100% natural ingredients for animal and human health and welfare.
Its portfolio includes 100% safe products, ensured by the total traceability of its production process (from the raw materials to the final consumer), and quality guaranteed by certifications ISO 9001:2008, ISO 22000:2005, AIB, Kosher, Halal, GMP+B2, and HACCP. 






Date: October 23, 2014
Contact: Merylin Miguel
Phone: (14) 3269-9270 

E-mail: merylin.miguel@biorigin.net
 
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

23/10/2014: Global salmon initative launches its first Progress Report at AQUASUR 2014

  
Global Salmon Initiative
Report showcases key activities and achievements of initiative in improving farmed salmon industry sustainability one year after launch

Puerto Montt, Chile – October 23, 2014 05:00 CLST: The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) today launched its inaugural progress report ‘Building the Foundation for a Sustainable Future’. This is the first report to come from the industry-led collective, and highlights its approach and progress towards advancing significant improvements in the environmental, social and economic sustainability of the salmon farming industry.

The release of the report comes just over a year since GSI was formally launched in August 2013, and the day before GSI member CEOs will speak at the AquaSur 2014 Pathways to Sustainability seminar in Puerto Montt, Chile.

“As we reflect on our successful first year, we are very proud to release this progress report, which shares what we have been working on. We now prepare for tomorrow’s session where we will be taking the stage with major industry players and our partners WWF, FAO and Rabobank to discuss the biggest challenges the industry faces looking ahead to 2020. We will also discuss the pathways in which we can collectively improve industry sustainability, while continuing to keep in mind the critical challenge of providing the highest quality protein to the world’s consumers”, said Ricardo Garcia GSI Co-Chair and CEO of Camanchaca.

The report provides an overview of the initiative’s current activities, and highlights progress in improving biosecurity, sourcing sustainable feed, achieving the ASC standard, building partnerships and enhancing transparency in reporting and communications. In addition to the growth of its membership, and expansion into three new farming regions, key 2013–2014 highlights reflected in the report include:

  • 13 GSI salmon farms have achieved the rigorous ASC standard certification
  • All GSI member companies are actively working to raise industry standards and plan for future certification
  • New biosecurity protocols have been developed and implemented, as a result of knowledge and best-practice sharing across companies and regions. Such action has resulted in a reduced sea lice count for this period in Chile
  • Efforts to source and evaluate sustainable feed through alternative EPA+DHA-rich resources have been initiated
  • GSI is developing a reporting dashboard that will track progress towards key environmental and social indicators, as well as report progress towards the ASC standard
GSI, now comprising 18 salmon producers across 9 countries, has also released a short film to accompany the report. The film shares the story behind the creation of GSI, the importance of its mandate, and its key achievements to date.

“We want those in our industry and beyond to understand the importance and impact GSI’s efforts are having on improving the sustainability of salmon farming. The ability to create a prosperous future for our industry depends on our success in continuing to cultivate change and improve the way things have been done. Over the past year, GSI has proven that we can come together and do just that, but despite significant progress we still have a way to go,” said Jon Hindar, GSI Co-Chair and CEO of Cermaq.

About GSI
The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) is a leadership initiative established in 2013 by global farmed salmon producers focused on making significant progress on industry sustainability. Today GSI comprises 18 companies, representing over 70% of the global salmon production industry, that are fully committed to realizing a shared goal of providing a highly sustainable source of healthy food to feed a growing global population, whilst minimizing our environmental footprint, and continuing to improve our social contribution.

GSI member companies are Bakkafrost; Blumar; Cermaq; Compañía Pesquera Camanchaca; Empresas AquaChile; Fjarolax ehf.; Grieg Seafood; Huon Aquaculture, Lerøy Seafood Group; Los Fiordos; Marine Harvest; Multiexport Foods SA; New Zealand King Salmon; Norway Royal Salmon; Pacific Star Salmon; SalMar; The Scottish Salmon Company; Scottish Sea Farms and Ventisqueros. GSI companies have a presence in Canada, Chile, the Faroe Islands, Ireland, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland and Tasmania, and make significant contributions to the economies of these respective countries.

For further information on GSI please visit or contact:
•             Website – www.globalsalmoninitiative.org
•             GSI Secretariat – GSI@axon-com.com
•             Twitter – @GSI_Salmon


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Thursday, October 16, 2014

17/10/2014: Sustainability - Over the next 40 years companies and individuals must do their fair share!

"You have in front of you a depressed man with a smiling face," Professor Jorgen Randers of BI Norwegian Business School told the 800-plus delegates attending this year's Biomin World Nutrition Conference in Munich, Germany this morning in his keynote address.
 

Professor Jorgen Randers addressing the World Nutrition Forum in Munich

Dr Randers as professor of climate strategy addressed the question of '2052 - A global forecast for the next 40 years'  went on to say, "I have spent the last 40 years working for sustainable development, working for a sustainable world and I have failed.

"The world is less sustainable today than I started my hard labours on sustainable development 40 years ago. The simplest way of indicating this is by the climate situation.
 
Food will satisfy global demand - but not need

"The simplest way to demonstrate this is that every year humanity is producing twice as much CO2 as is being absorbed by the earth. The remainder stays in the atmosphere with a half-life of more than 100 years and as this concentration goes up the temperature goes up. This will continue until we stop emitting CO2 into the atmosphere.

"A highly unsustainable situation where dramatic change is needed if we want to move in the direction of sustainability.

With a projected world population of eight billion by 2040, he pointed to three factors that will impact the development of the world as it progresses over the next 40 years would see world populations increases being to decline as the trend by women to have less children continue below the 1.8 in both the developed and developing world.

The second major impact on countries will be the overall decline in GDP which will slow down as populations progressively move from the land to factories and then into health care - or caring for the elderly.

"Economic development is shifting towards health care as clearly shown in the USA, Switzerland and other developed countries."

He said 17 percent of the USA's working population is already in the health care sector and probably more were needed.

"Productively increases based on output per person is lower in these areas."

Professor Randers says that the GDP growth rate in these countries will probably be zero percent over the next 40 years while poorer countries will see growth in primary and secondary employment as they continue to go through the steps from farm to factory to health care eventually. He sees China following the path both Japan and Korea have taken.

He also sees developed countries spending resources not only on health care but also overcoming new problems associated with pollution, climate change, etc.

"We will have to spend labour and capital to combat these things."

Other observations included solar and wind power squeezing out fossil fuel use long before reserves of these energy sources are depleted; CO2 emissions will peak in 2030; temperatures will increase by two degrees by 2050 but will not bring about catastrophic climate collapse before 2050; world food is enough to satisfy demand up to 2050 but significant starvation will remain as is currently the case and was in 1970; food will not be in short supply but rather people will not have sufficient income to pay for it.

"Starvation will not be caused by physical limitations, but by income constraints. Food production will flow as demand grows and not as the need for food grows."

"How can you be sure I'm right?" he asked his audience.

"We know from past experience that people will continue to choose the cheapest solutions - the cheapest and most profitable. This is a fundamental driver with most people not wanting to make a sacrifice today for an advantage in the future."

He said moving just two percent of the world's workforce from 'dirty' jobs to 'clean' jobs in environmental terms and moving just two percent of the world's capital into clean energies will solve the problems we face.

"But that's more expensive than doing nothing. So it won't happen."

Optimists believe the market will solve the problem. This will not work either, given the short-termism of capitalism and the need to be profitable, he explained.

He believes the suggested strategy of businesses aligning itself with social requirements to help solve these problems will not work either, given that carbon taxes have not worked.

He concluded by saying that companies need to work politically to bring about long term change, especially if we are to improve world hunger and that we as private individuals need to do our fair share "to help turn the ship in time," he concluded.

 
Individuals need to do their fair share "to help turn the ship in time" - Professor Randers

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

15/10/2014: World Nutrition Forum connects with the future and the BMW i8



Also on the podium in front of some 800 delegates this evening at the World Nutrition Forum 2014 - besides Biomin executives - was the latest hybrid offering from BMW - the sporty and efficient BMW i8.

BMW expressed great delight in hosting so many delegates from so many countries in its auditorium at one time in Munich - and had even introduced 'Biomin green' lighting in recognition and appreciation of the company bringing so many people together in one place in Germany.

In keeping with the theme of the Forum, BMW pointed out that connecting its past (almost 100 years old) to its future was all important in providing customers with 'trust'; trust that it's future developments would be as sound as its developments of the past.

This was as true for the food industry as it was for the automotive industry.


Read more about i8 HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

15/10/2014: Added value on the agenda of first day at Aquaculture Europe 2014

"We began Aquaculture Europe in a very unusual way this morning," Alistair Lane told IAF. He was referring to the cooking demonstration from nano-gastronomy chef Mikel Gallo which formed part of the plenary session 'Adding Societal Value: From Aquaculture to Gastronomy.'
Networking opportunities were an added value on the first day of Aquaculture Europe 2014!

Alistair also commented on the networking opportunities this event has created.

"People have been talking to each other throughout the day and that is what it is all about."

Mario Stael who is the organiser of the Aquaculture Europe 2014 added that there was a great mixture of "professional people and academic people which is very important" for the future of the industry.

Staff of IAF and others are looking forward to meeting fish farmers from Spain, Italy and Greece tomorrow at the Sea Bass and Sea Bream Workshop.

 
More to follow tomorrow
 

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

15/10/2014: 800-plus delegates from 68 countries attend Biomin's World Nutrition Forum reception

Biomin's World Nutrition Forum 2014 got underway this evening with a reception and buffet dinner for some 800 delegates from 86 countries at the impressive and purpose-built BMW World centre here in Munich, Germany.
 
Delegates head into BMW World in Munich, Germany


The comprehensive range of BMW models were on display for delegates

In his opening remarks of welcome, Biomin's CEO Christian Seiwald pointed out that the food industry had to choose carefully when using the earth's limited resources.
 
Biomin's CEO Christian Seiwald welcomes delegates to the World Nutrition Forum 2014

"Do we have the resources to approach issues of health, food safety, environment and the future of the next generations? Do we have an industry today capable of being sustainable? 


"Do we have the attitude to meet our obligations towards society and that of future generations. What qualifications do farmers of the future need in order to do their business sustainably?

"Indeed, do we have the power to feed the world?"
Mr Seiwald said.
 
These and many other questions will form the basis of discussions and topics for the next two days' discussions he told his audience. He closed his brief welcome by thanking all those who were attending and particularly those who had come the furthermost to Munich.


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

15/10/2014: Invitation to attend the GSI seminar 'Pathways to Sustainability' at AquaSur

We would like to inform you that later this month, at the AquaSur conference in Chile, GSI will be hosting a seminar titled ‘Pathways to Sustainability’, where a panel of GSI CEOs will be sharing their experiences and will provide an update on the progress being made.

The GSI panel will also be joined by a collection of esteemed speakers, who will be sharing their views and insights on the importance of making improvements in sustainability, and how the industry can look to mitigate future challenges to ensure continued progress. Key speakers include – Jose Vilallon, Corporate Sustainability Director Nutreco; Ricardo Bosshard, Director WWF Chile; Doris Soto, Senior Aquaculture Officer FAO and Jose Miguel Burgos, Director of National Marine Fisheries Service.

The seminar is taking place on Friday October 24, 2014 from 08:00 – 13:15.

Full details for the event can be found in the invitation attached, and we do hope you are able to join us. To note, in order to join the seminar you will need to be registered for the conference, which you can do so at the AquaSur website HERE.
 

Please RSVP (if not already done so) at: GSI@axon-com.com  


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news